Christian Life

9 Days for Life: Day 4

I will be sharing the materials provided by the USCCB on the prayers, reflections, and call to action for each day on this blog. If you would like to download the PDF that includes all  9 days you can download it at the USCCB.

From the USCCB Novena 9 Days 2017 Full Color PDF:

Day Four: Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Intercession: May those near the end of their lives receive medical care that respects their dignity and protects their lives.

Prayers: Our Father, 3 Hail Marys, Glory Be

Reflection: When Maggie’s active father suffered an accident that eventually led to his passing, her conversations with him turned to life’s more serious topics, and his final days became a time that was cherished by the whole family. During this time, Maggie’s dad taught her that “dignity can’t be diminished by pain or loss of personal control,” that “Jesus was walking along with him,” and that “our suffering is not meaningless when we unite it with Christ’s own suffering.”

As a 50-year-old wife and mother of three, Maggie needed this message in a dramatically new way when she was diagnosed with a terminal illness. Instead of giving up hope, she embraced the legacy her father had left her, cherishing the life she still had left: “[M]y life is, always has been, and always will be, worth living.” Read more about her experience in “Maggie’s Story: Living like Dad” (www.goo.gl/JKnvWc).  

Acts of Reparation (choose one):

  • Take time to write a handwritten note to someone who is lonely or needing encouragement.
  • Meet Maggie in the brief, 3-minute video (goo.gl/SGF7rP) that inspired the article, “Maggie’s Story: Living like Dad.”
  • Read and reflect upon “Caring for Loved Ones at Life’s End” (goo.gl/fvSEYp). Ten suggestions anchored in unconditional respect for human life help readers know how to provide authentically compassionate care. (Supplemental information: www.goo.gl/Ji3n35)

One Step Further: Proponents of doctor-assisted suicide try to draw a sharp distinction between those with a mental illness who want to end their lives and those with a terminal illness who express the same wish. “Every Suicide is Tragic” (www.goo.gl/KEXpR9) explores the consequences of this false distinction. (Supplemental information, including short videos: www.goo.gl/ufQyTv).

Copyright © 2016, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Washington, DC. All rights reserved.

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